How to Remove Heat Stains from Wood Furniture

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Did you leave something like a hot Pizza Box on your wood table? There’s an easy fix to remove heat stains from wood furniture.

I know, I know. Most of my posts are full of pretty pictures. I usually show you how I remodel, build and craft. But sometimes we need to fix things too. Like my quick fix for ugly grout or my tutorial for how to restain a wood door without removing it. Today’s fix is How to Remove Heat Stains from Wood Furniture. Yay!

We’ve all seen those heat marks on wood. Some people think that mark is permanent and they’ll need to replace that furniture or paint over it. But, there’s an easy fix that works for most of these marks. And, strange as it sounds, that fix is steam!

Seems like that would only make things worse. But, watch my video below and you’ll see exactly how it worked on the pizza box mark that was left on my Dining Room Table.

How to Fix White Heat Marks on Wood Tables. If you've ever left a hot pizza box on a wood table, you've probably had this happen. Luckily there is a pretty quick fix for how to remove heat stains on wood furniture. And, all you need is an iron to fix it.
Don’t forget to Save this DIY on Pinterest.

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What you Need

Good news, you probably already have everything you need to remove heat stains from wood furniture.

  • A Tea Towel or Similar Cloth (old pillowcase or sheets with out texture)
  • An Iron Filled and Set to Steam

Please Note: I cannot guarantee that this DIY will work to remove heat stains from wood furniture, in every case. It will work for most, but use your best judgement. This is an attempt to save your furniture. You accept the responsibility for this fix. Read the full disclaimer for my DIY here.

If you have a soft, thick varnish finish: Be sure to not use a textured towel, only apply the iron for a few seconds at a time, start without steam to see if that works. Those older soft finishes take on texture and imprints easily. So, use caution and your best judgement.

DIY Steps and Video for how to quickly and easily remove those white heat marks on wood. how to remove heat stains from wood table. #HeatStains #HeatMarks
The heat mark is gone! This table is ready for those holiday parties. Check out my DIY Simple Coffered Ceiling, for more DIY projects from my Dining Room.

Directions for How to Remove Heat Stains from Wood Furniture

  1. Start by filling your iron with tap water. Then turn it on and set to Steam. Wait a few minutes for it to heat up.
  2. Find a clean dry tea towel or similar fabric. Make sure that it doesn’t have any vinyl decals, scratchy embroidery or embellishments, or bleeding colors.
  3. Fold the towel up and set it on the mark. You can see how I do all of the steps for how to remove heat stains from wood furniture in the video below.
  4. Apply the iron and press the steam button while slightly moving around on the mark for about 10 seconds.
  5. Pull iron away and wipe the spot dry to check your progress.
  6. As long as it’s not getting worse (which I’ve never seen or heard of, but there’s probably a situation where it might) keep repeating steps 4 and 5 until the mark is gone. Will likely take 10-15 sets.

Watch this Video to See How Quickly this Fix Works


That’s it for how to remove heat stains from wood furniture! Time to throw that holiday or dinner party to show off that table!


Looking for another Easy Home Maintenance Project? You can Restore your Grout to Like New and this product seals grout too. Yay! Watch the quick video to see how easy it is, then click here to see the Grout Restoring Tutorial.

Or, this amazingly easy DIY for how to clean your car seats at home.

Written steps and a how to video showing how to Clean Car Seats at Home, the Easy Way with a portable Bissell SpotClean Pro. This even worked on my gross chocolate milk covered seats!

And, if it is time to Stain your Front Door, check out these steps for how I restain a front door without stripping it or removing it. 🙂

Check out the incredible makeover on this Office Chair I rescued from the curb.

Beautiful office chair makeover and fixing roller wheels on this chair I found on the curb. Trash to treasure story with full details on the steps to restore an office chair and fix the roller wheels.


Feeling inspired? Now that you’ve read my steps for how to remove heat stains from wood furniture, have fun and let me know if you have questions. Or post pictures of your work and tag Abbotts At Home on FB, I’d love to see it!

How to Remove Heat Stains from Wood Furniture

DIY Steps and Video for how to quickly and easily remove those white heat marks on wood. how to remove heat stains from wood table. #HeatStains #HeatMarks
Did you leave something like a hot Pizza Box on your wood table? There’s an easy fix to remove heat stains from wood furniture.

Tools

  • Steam Iron

Instructions

Please Note: I cannot guarantee that this DIY will work to remove heat stains from wood furniture, in every case. It will work for most, but use your best judgement. This is an attempt to save your furniture. You accept the responsibility for this fix. Read the full disclaimer for my DIY here.

If you have a soft, thick varnish finish: Be sure to not use a textured towel, only apply the iron for a few seconds at a time, start without steam to see if that works. Those older soft finishes take on texture and imprints easily. So, use caution and your best judgement.

  1. Start by filling your iron with tap water. Then turn it on and set to Steam. Wait a few minutes for it to heat up.
  2. Find a clean dry tea towel or similar fabric. Make sure that it doesn’t have any vinyl decals, scratchy embroidery or embellishments, or bleeding colors.
  3. Fold the towel up and set it on the mark. You can see how I do all of the steps for how to remove heat stains from wood furniture in the video below.
  4. Apply the iron and press the steam button while slightly moving around on the mark for about 10 seconds.
  5. Pull iron away and wipe the spot dry to check your progress.
  6. As long as it’s not getting worse (which I’ve never seen or heard of, but there’s probably a situation where it might) keep repeating steps 4 and 5 until the mark is gone. Will likely take 10-15 sets.

Notes

We’ve all seen those heat marks on wood. Some people think that mark is permanent and they’ll need to replace that furniture or paint over it. But, there’s an easy fix that works for most of these marks. And, strange as it sounds, that fix is steam!

Seems like that would only make things worse. But, watch my video below and you’ll see exactly how it worked on the pizza box mark that was left on my Dining Room Table.

11 thoughts on “How to Remove Heat Stains from Wood Furniture”

  1. I’ve used this method for years on various pieces of furniture that I have purchased from yard sales or thrift stores. The white mark is because moisture has become trapped in the finish. I use a DRY iron, not steam. One caution: if your furniture piece has a heavy coat of varnish, shellac, etc. on it, be sure to keep moving your iron around and not leave it in one spot. The heat from the iron may soften the finish and your towel may become embedded in the finish making the problem worse. Also, I make sure that my towel has little to no texture/nap which could also leave marks in the softened finish. I try to use lint free cotton towels or cheap paper towels that have no texture or printed patterns on them.

    This method also works for removing candle wax from carpets, table cloths, etc. It will remove the wax but may not remove the colored dye that was in the candle wax.

    • Really good tips! So glad you commented. I can see how an old thick varnish would mess up if the heat is applied too long or with a textured towel.Thanks!

  2. Your video is great. I wish I had known this years ago when I marked a friends wooden table. I was a bit confused with your headings above, seemed like it was about cleaning grout.
    Thanks for sharing this most helpful post.
    Kathleen
    Blogger’s Pit Stop

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